Media Update – July 24, 2003

1. Setting a new standard
2. Cops crash sex party
3. Zoning Issue: Sex clubs elude county
4. Questionable Clubs Targeted For Closure By County
5. Owensville upset about new business
6. Punishment is the crime in Sue's bet with Mitch
7. Storm's Bird calls off bets, ending chance of a spanking

1. Setting a new standard
2. Cops crash sex party
3. Zoning Issue: Sex clubs elude county
4. Questionable Clubs Targeted For Closure By County
5. Owensville upset about new business
6. Punishment is the crime in Sue's bet with Mitch
7. Storm's Bird calls off bets, ending chance of a spanking

Setting a new standard

By Norah Vincent
The Advocate
August 2003

If they're anything like the rest of the let-live heterosexual population in the nation, by this time most straights are probably sick of hearing about gay sex. They figure it's not their gig. They figure that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision overturning antigay sodomy laws, laws that have recently been stirring such a rumpus between gay activists and the GOP, has nothing to do with average folk. Whether gays get the right to do their deed in their own homes is a matter of relative indifference to them.

But it shouldn't be, because the Texas case was only superficially about sodomy. It was really about the right to privacy and the moral standard by which that right should be applied. And that is something they and every other Jack and Jill should care about, because there may be one or two things they do in their bedroom, or perhaps at the Super 8 Motel, to which Republican U.S. senator Rick "Sanitarium" Santorum of Pennsylvania and his would-be dormitory patrol would take mighty exception if they caught them at it.

The legal standard for sexual privacy should be this: No private sexual act should be illegal as long as all parties to it are consenting adults and no one else is harmed in the process. By this standard, as long as they do not involve children, such practices as incest, polygamy, sadomasochism, oral sex, sodomy, orgies, and even prostitution should be legal, because they harm no one but their consenting adult practitioners and are, therefore, nobody's business. [cont.]

To read this article, go to:
http://www.advocate.com/html/stories/895_6/895_6_vincent.asp
To respond, write to: letters@advocate.com

Cops crash sex party

By Zeb Carabello
The Gilroy Dispatch (CA)
July 23, 2003


South County's latest couple-swapping swingers club – The Arena located in unincorporated Morgan Hill – will likely be forced to close its doors by September, a county zoning investigator said today.


Charging guests for Internet-promoted "lifestyle" parties in a ranch-style home on the southeast corner of Hill Road and Barrett Avenue every weekend night since June 6, the club continues to agitate nearby residents, who originally contacted county zoning regarding the legality of operating a private club in a neighborhood zoned for residential and agricultural use only.


"The paperwork is not all in, but my guess is that (The Arena) will be asked to get out of Dodge," said Jim Lanz, the Santa Clara County zoning investigator handling The Arena's case. "It will be very difficult for them to obtain a permit for a private club." [cont.]


To read this article go to:
http://gilroydispatch.com/news/newsview.asp?c=67178
To respond, write to: editor@gilroydispatch.com


Zoning Issue: Sex clubs elude county

By K.C. Howard
Las Vegas Review-Journal
July 21, 2003


Inside The Green Door's Sahara Avenue storefront lies the business of free love, an enterprise that county officials have unsuccessfully tried to quash for the past year. The social club located in the Commercial Center strip mall boasts plush surroundings and beds where couples can get intimate. For varying entrance fees, patrons can wander nude or clothed, engage in sex or just observe others engaging in sex.


The business is one of several so-called swingers clubs in Clark County that county zoning officials say operate illegally. Last year, county commissioners enacted a zoning ordinance defining and prohibiting the sex clubs. But a year later, The Green Door, along with at least two other swingers clubs — the Red Rooster Too and Fantasy Social Club — continue operations. All three have obtained general business licenses to operate in the Commercial Center.


Lichtenstein said The Green Door has the appropriate business licenses for everything the establishment provides. The health and fitness center, restaurant, gift and novelty sales, admission fees and amusement machines licenses are legal operations in the commercial district where the club sits.


He said his club is a target for politicians who object to the clubs on moral grounds. He and other club owners argue such businesses provide a clean and safe environment for couples and singles to relax while spicing up their love lives. [cont.]


To read this article, go to:
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2003/Jul-21-Mon-2003/news/21581992.html
To respond, write to: letters@reviewjournal.com


Questionable Clubs Targeted For Closure By County

By Lisa Johnson
KLAS-TV (Nevada)
July 21, 2003


The county has been trying to stop them for a year now, but it's a business that keeps on swinging. The county calls them sex clubs or swingers joints. Their owners call them social clubs or spas. County zoning officials say whatever you call them they are illegal and must stop.


Last year Clark County established a zoning variance prohibiting such clubs. Clark County officials vow to shut these clubs down within a year, but it's not that easy because most got their licenses as health clubs.


The Green Door is staying open saying the county can't enforce where people privately go to have consensual sex. So far clubs have beaten the law by holding "private parties" that don't need permits. [cont.]


To read this article, go to:
http://www.klas-tv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1369653&nav=168XH1V3
To respond, write to: cbleakley@klastv.com



Owensville upset about new business

By Melinda Roeder
WTVW (Owensville, IN)
July 18, 2003


Some Gibson County residents are furious about a new "swingers club" that's opened just outside of Owensville. A swingers club is where couples go to have sex with other couples.


It's a small town with small town values. So neighbors were shocked when they found out a swingers club moved into Owensville. "I think it's disgusting," resident Chris Hudson said.


"I just think it's a little bizarre, really," Sheriff Allen Harmon said. "Obviously I don't think it's something we need." Harmon has taken a lot of phone calls from upset neighbors, but he doesn't think there's much he can do about the new club. "As far as I can tell," he said, "there really is not anything illegal at this point that's going on that I know of."


But local leaders believe it's definitely a black eye for the community. [cont.]


To read this article, go to:
http://www.wtvw.com/Global/story.asp?S=1366147&nav=7CPEGyfW
To respond, write to: nminton@wtvw.com



Punishment is the crime in Sue's bet with Mitch

By Steve Kelley
Seattle Times
July 20, 2003


Sue Bird has agreed to be spanked. In public. By sports talk host Mitch Levy. Bird has even agreed, if she loses a bet with the morning maven of misogyny, to cry, "Harder, Daddy, harder," during the spanking.


She says it's all in good fun. That it's just between Levy and her. But it isn't fun. It isn't funny. And the entire community, not just Levy and her, is involved.


"It's terrible," said State Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, who teaches women's studies at the University of Washington and is a regular at Storm games. "Oh, my gosh, it's really dreadful. It undoes so much of the good she represents for young women in the game.


"It helps feed into the images of violence against women and stereotyping. I don't condemn her. I appreciate that she doesn't have the experience in life that other women have had. But this could be very hurtful. Not just to the WNBA, but to other women and girls." [cont.]


To read this article, go to:
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2001175123_kell20.html
To respond, write to: opinion@seattletimes.com


Storm's Bird calls off bets, ending chance of a spanking

Seattle Times
July 22, 2003


Storm guard Sue Bird has canceled the bets made earlier this season with a sports radio talk-show host who had proposed to spank her on his program if she lost the wager.


Bird, 22, apologized to fans, saying in a team statement that she made the bet "as a good-natured way to draw the radio talent and listeners to Storm games."


After realizing the bet had offended some people, Bird decided to call it off.


Storm vice president Karen Bryant supported Bird's decision. "The Storm is focused on maintaining its role as a positive group of female role models, specifically a team of talented and strong athletes," Bryant said. [cont.]


To read this article, go to:
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2001199336_bird22.html
To respond, write to: opinion@seattletimes.com


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